Camera traps bring you closer to the secretive natural world and are an important conservation tool to study wildlife. This week we’re meeting South America’s crab-eating fox. The crab-eating fox (Cerdocyon thous), also known as the forest fox or wood fox, is a medium-sized canid found throughout most of South America from sea level to 3,000 meters high. It is mainly active during the night and during the day they burrow in a den dug by other animals despite being capable diggers. These dens are often located in thick grass and bushes, and each den usually has many entrance holes. The crab-eating fox can be solitary but can also form couples or even families of up to five individuals. It hunts alone and is a generalist omnivore that is able to use environments disturbed by human activities. The species gets its name because during the wet season it searches for crabs on muddy floodplains. Currently, the crab-eating foxe is listed as Least Concern on the IUCN Red List and its population remains stable. Its main threat is habitat destruction as a result of human activity and getting diseases from feral dogs. Watch the video to learn more about this species! Special thanks to Paula Prist and Jeffrey Esparza for sharing their camera trap footage. Paula R. Prist is a biologist that works with the effects of landscape structure on human health, more specifically investigating how habitat loss and fragmentation, land use changes, and diversity loss affect the transmission risk of zoonotic…This article was originally published on Mongabay Läs mer

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