Becca Brunner was standing chest-deep in an Ecuadoran rainforest stream, holding up audio equipment as she recorded the high-pitched call of an elusive glass frog. But then she encountered something unexpected: the frog was fluttering its front and back legs as well as bobbing its head. “I was basically in the pool of water that was right underneath the waterfall with my microphone,” Brunner, a doctoral candidate at the University of California, Berkeley, told Mongabay in an interview. “When I noticed that it was doing these flipping movements, I got even more excited, of course, but I had to come out of the stream.” Brunner climbed the steep, slick waterfall, and balanced precariously on one foot to capture video of the frog’s waving routine. “You’d have to be a crazy person like me to scale a slippery waterfall to find this out,” she said. But to Brunner, her efforts were worth it. She had discovered that the glass frog (Sachatamia orejuela), which mainly lives in the spray zones of waterfalls, didn’t just communicate acoustically, but also used visual signaling. While it’s still not clear why these frogs wave their limbs and bob their heads, Brunner says it’s likely to attract females or to lay claim to territory, although this needs further investigation. “The really cool thing about the waving is that they need to add this other component because they live near really loud environments,” said Brunner, who co-authored a paper on the discovery. “That’s the most exciting part to…This article was originally published on Mongabay Läs mer

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