JAKARTA — Recent floods that inundated large areas of the southern part of Indonesian Borneo might have been exacerbated by massive deforestation for oil palm plantations and coal mines, activists say. Heavy rains over the course of several days in early January battered the province of South Kalimantan, causing the Barito and other rivers to overflow. Floodwaters, in some areas as high as 3 meters (10 feet), forced the displacement of more than 112,000 people and claimed at least 21 lives. Nearly 200,000 hectares (500,000 acres) have been affected. President Joko Widodo, during a visit to the affected district of Banjar, attributed the disaster to the heavy and sustained rainfall. But environmentalists say the rapid loss of forest in the region in recent decades contributed to the scale of the flooding. An area twice the size of London has been deforested in the Barito River’s watershed over the past 10 years, according to data from the Indonesian space agency, LAPAN. More than half of the 322,000 hectares (800,000 acres) cleared comprised primary and secondary forest and scrubland. A separate analysis of satellite imagery by Greenpeace shows 304,000 hectares (750,000 acres) of forest lost in South Kalimantan’s watershed areas between 2001 and 2019. It shows the Barito watershed now has less than half of its original forest cover, while the watershed of another river in the province, the Maluka, has less than 1% of its forest cover remaining. “It shows the carrying capacity of the forests in that region has drastically…This article was originally published on Mongabay Läs mer

SRNF Nyhetsbrev

SRNF Nyhetsbrev

Åh hej där 👋 Det är trevligt att träffa dig

Registrera för att hålla dig uppdaterad både som MEDLEM eller PRENUMERANT.

* Vi gör inte spam!! Läs vår integritetspolicy för mer information.

close

SRNF Nyhetsbrev

SRNF Nyhetsbrev

Åh hej där 👋 Det är trevligt att träffa dig

Registrera för att hålla dig uppdaterad både som MEDLEM eller PRENUMERANT.

* Vi gör inte spam!! Läs vår integritetspolicy för mer information.