The cliffs of Acopán-tepuí in Venezuela where the new orchid species, Epidendrum katarun-yariku, grows. Photo courtesy of Mateusz Wrazidlo. On an expedition in the tepuis, or “sprouting rock,” landscape of the Guiana Highlands in South America, Mateusz Wrazidlo snapped a photo of an orchid he had never seen before. Back in the herbarium, a place where dried plant samples are kept for research, he and his colleague, the orchid expert Eric Hágsater, determined it was a species new to science “Our new species is another beautiful looking member of the Epidendrum family, but in my humble opinion it’s not the looks that make it special — it is the name it was given,” Wrazidlo, a Ph.D. student at the Silesian University of Technology in Poland, told Mongabay in an email. Inflorescence of the newly discovered orchid, Epidendrum katarun-yariku. Each flower is around 5 millimeters (0.2 inches) across. Image courtesy of Mateusz Wrazidlo. A full Epidendrum katarun-yariku plant is nearly one meter (three feet) tall. Image courtesy of Mateusz Wrazidlo. All species names consist of two parts. The first part is the genus, or the larger group the organism is related to. The second part, the specific name, is typically chosen by the person who found the new species. Often, this second name is based on a Latin word that describes the species, or is a name selected to honor a personal hero. But Wrazidlo decided to take a different approach. “I thought it would be a nice gesture to…This article was originally published on Mongabay Läs mer

SRNF Nyhetsbrev

SRNF Nyhetsbrev

Åh hej där 👋 Det är trevligt att träffa dig

Registrera för att hålla dig uppdaterad både som MEDLEM eller PRENUMERANT.

* Vi gör inte spam!! Läs vår integritetspolicy för mer information.

close

SRNF Nyhetsbrev

SRNF Nyhetsbrev

Åh hej där 👋 Det är trevligt att träffa dig

Registrera för att hålla dig uppdaterad både som MEDLEM eller PRENUMERANT.

* Vi gör inte spam!! Läs vår integritetspolicy för mer information.