The world is facing an ongoing sixth mass extinction. To curb this human-caused loss of global biodiversity, many countries have made commitments to protect and conserve large areas of land in the coming decades. But the fate of the Indigenous peoples, local communities, and Afro-descendants who live on these lands remains unclear. A new study conducted by the Rights and Resources Initiative (RRI) in collaboration with the Campaign for Nature addresses the risks these groups face from exclusionary conservation measures and urges decision-makers to adopt rights-based conservation approaches. Safeguarding at least 30% of Earth’s land surface by 2030 is a goal in the current draft of the U.N.’s Convention on Biological Diversity post-2020 Global Biodiversity framework. However, the current draft does not include protections for the rights more than 1.65 billion Indigenous peoples, local communities and Afro-descendants who live in what are referred to as “important biodiversity conservation areas” or areas that scientists say need protection to prevent biodiversity collapse. More than 1.65 billion Indigenous peoples, local communities, and Afro-descendants who live in what are referred to as “important biodiversity conservation areas” or areas that scientists say need protection to prevent biodiversity collapse. Past approaches to creating protected areas have involved relocating people or banning access and traditional use of land from its historical inhabitants. An estimated 136 million people have been displaced in the process of formally protecting land. Using these historical models to expand conservation would be “highly contentious, prohibitively expensive and come with human rights costs that will…This article was originally published on Mongabay Läs mer