*This article is a collaboration between Mongabay Latam and GK, Ecuador.   At the beginning of June 2020, Ecuador’s National Assembly overwhelmingly passed the Oil Palm Law, officially called the Law for the Promotion and Development of the Production, Commercialization, Extraction, Exportation and Industrialization of Palm Oil and its Derivatives. This is the first law that seeks to regulate economic activities related to oil palm in Ecuador. The new legislation establishes mechanisms for the commercialization of palm oil, which could include instruments of price stabilization, the creation of a technical committee to promote the sector, and a series of sanctions for noncompliance. Those sanctions could range from a fine to exclusion from the national registry of palm oil producers. The law also opens the door for damages to be assessed against palm oil companies found liable due to legal action, on top of fines that could be imposed on them by the state. Among other things, the law prohibits: the cultivation of oil palm in water protection areas, use of banned pesticides, failure to report pesticide contamination, establishment of plantations in protected areas, and failure to engage in prior consultation with communities. But critics say it doesn’t go far enough. “This law doesn’t envisage any change in the production model as we know it, which is destroying everything we have. It’s just more of the same,” says Malki Sáenz, coordinator of the Socioenvironmental Research Unit at Universidad Andina. According to Sáenz, the law ignores the environmental and social context of…This article was originally published on Mongabay Läs mer