A long and intense fire season is exacting a grim toll across Madagascar. At its onset in May, a wave of fires ate into the dry forests that line the island’s western coast, one of the world’s most threatened biomes. In the past two months, the rainforests fringing the eastern coast have gone up in flames. “This year, the fire points in Madagascar are very numerous bush fires, forest fires, urban fires,” said Haingosoa Hortençia, a national coordinator for the Green Party, who until recently worked at the environment ministry, or MEDD. “There are fires all over the twenty-two regions of Madagascar.” An interactive map from Global Forest Watch displaying fire alerts recorded by NASA satellites from September 1 to December 1 this year. In the period from May to November, 50,000 more fire alerts were recorded this year compared to last year, a 17% rise, as per NASA satellite data analyzed by the forest mapping platform Global Forest Watch (GFW). In the past three months alone Madagascar has reported nearly 200,000 fire alerts. Hortençia blamed the environment minister’s “negligence, ignorance and bad governance,” for the situation, saying they should have had a longer-term strategy to fight the fires and been more responsive to reports from the ground. The minister contests these claims. Fire alerts recorded by NASA satellites from May 1 to Aug 1. 2020/ Global Forest Watch. Fire alerts recorded by NASA satellites from September 1 to December 1. 2020/ Global Forest Watch. One could fit 16 Madagascar-sized…This article was originally published on Mongabay Läs mer